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Plutus   


Plague take you! you cursed rascal, who rail at us and have not
even the heart to tell us why your master has made us come. We were
pressed for time and tired out, yet we came with all haste, and in our
hurry we have passed by lots of wild onions without even gathering
them.
CARIO
I will no longer conceal the truth from you. Friends, it's
Plutus whom my master brings, Plutus, who will give you riches.
LEADER OF THE CHORUS
What! we shall really all become rich?
CARIO
Aye, certainly; you will then be Midases, provided you grow
ass's ears.
LEADER OF THE CHORUS
What joy, what happiness! If what you tell me is true, I long to
dance with delight.
CARIO (singing, with appropriate gestures)
And I too, threttanelo! want to imitate the Cyclops and lead
your troop by stamping like this. Do you, my dear little ones, cry,
aye, cry again and bleat forth the plaintive song of the sheep and
of the stinking goats; follow me like lascivious goats with their
tools out.
LEADER OF THE CHORUS
(Singing, to the same tune and with similar mimicry)
As for us, threttanelo! we will seek you, dear Cyclops,
bleating, and if we find you with your wallet full of fresh herbs, all
disgusting in your filth, sodden with wine and sleeping in the midst
of your sheep, we will seize a great flaming stake and burn out your
eye.
CARIO
I will copy that Circe of Corinth, whose potent philtres compelled
the companions of Philonides like swine to swallow balls of dung,
which she herself had kneaded with her hands; and do you too grunt
with joy and follow your mother, my little pigs.
LEADER OF THE CHORUS
Oh! Circe with the potent philtress, who besmear your companions
so filthily, what pleasure I shall have in imitating the son of
Laertes! I will hang you up by your balls, I will rub your nose with
dung like a goat, and like Aristyllus you shall say through your
half-opened lips, "Follow your mother, my little pigs."
CARIO
Enough of tomfoolery, assume a grave demeanour; unknown to my
master I am going to take bread and meat; and when I have fed well,
I shall resume my work.
(Interlude of dancing by the CHORUS.)
CHREMYLUS (coming out of his house)
To say, "Hail! my dear neighbours!" is an old form of greeting and
well worn with use; so therefore I embrace you, because you have not
crept like tortoises, but have come rushing here in all haste. Now
help me to watch carefully and closely over the god.
LEADER OF THE CHORUS
Be at ease. You shall see with what martial zeal I will guard him.
What! we jostle each other at the Assembly for three obols, and am I
going to let Plutus in person be stolen from me?
CHREMYLUS
But I see Blepsidemus; by his bearing and his haste I can
readily see he knows or suspects something.
BLEPSIDEMUS
What has happened then? Whence, how has Chremylus suddenly grown
rich? I don't believe a word of it. Nevertheless, nothing but his
sudden fortune was being talked about in the barber-shops. But I am
above all surprised that his good fortune has not made him forget
his friends; that is not the usual way!
CHREMYLUS

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