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The Thesmophoriazusae   


SCYTHIAN
Why, yes! of Gorgos!
EURIPIDES
"But what do I behold? A young maiden, beautiful as the immortals,
chained to this rock like a vessel in port?"
MNESILOCHUS
"Take pity on me, oh stranger! I am so unhappy and distraught!
Free me from these bonds."
SCYTHIAN
You keep still! a curse upon your impudence! you are going to die,
and yet you will be chattering!
EURIPIDES
"Oh! virgin! I take pity on your chains."
SCYTHIAN
But this is no virgin; he's an old rogue, a cheat and a thief.
EURIPIDES
You have lost your wits, Scythian. This is Andromeda, the daughter
of Cepheus.
SCYTHIAN (lifting up MNESILOCHUS' robe)
But look at his tool; it's pretty big.
EURIPIDES
Give me your hand, that I may descend near this young maiden. Each
man has his own particular weakness; as for me I am aflame with love
for this virgin.
SCYTHIAN
Oh! I'm not jealous; and as he has his arse turned this way,
why, I don't care if you make love to him.
EURIPIDES
"Ah! let me release her, and hasten to join her on the bridal
couch."
SCYTHIAN
If you are so eager to make the old man, you can bore through
the plank, and so get at him.
EURIPIDES
No, I will break his bonds.
SCYTHIAN
Beware of my lash!
EURIPIDES
No matter.
SCYTHIAN
This blade shall cut off your head.
EURIPIDES
"Ah! what can be done? what arguments can I use? This savage
will understand nothing! The newest and most cunning fancies are a
dead letter to the ignorant. Let us invent some artifice to fit in
with his coarse nature."
(He departs.)
SCYTHIAN
I can see the rascal is trying to outwit me.
MNESILOCHUS
Ah! Perseus! remember in what condition you are leaving me.
SCYTHIAN
Are you wanting to feel my lash again!
CHORUS (singing)
Oh! Pallas, who art fond of dances, hasten hither at my call.
Oh! thou chaste virgin, the protectress of Athens, I call thee in
accordance with the sacred rites, thee, whose evident protection we
adore and who keepest the keys of our city in thy hands. Do thou
appear, thou whose just hatred has overturned our tyrants. The
womenfolk are calling thee; hasten hither at their bidding along
with Peace, who shall restore the festivals. And ye, august goddesses,
display a smiling and propitious countenance to our gaze; come into
your sacred grove, the entry to which is forbidden to men; 'tis
there in the midst of the sacred orgies that we contemplate your

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