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Meteorology   


divided in the same way. Let us also begin by laying down that those

things are locally contrary which are locally most distant from one

another, just as things specifically most remote from one another

are specific contraries. Now things that face one another from

opposite ends of a diameter are locally most distant from one another.

(See diagram.)

Let A be the point where the sun sets at the equinox and B, the

point opposite, the place where it rises at the equinox. Let there

be another diameter cutting this at right angles, and let the point

H on it be the north and its diametrical opposite O the south. Let Z

be the rising of the sun at the summer solstice and E its setting at

the summer solstice; D its rising at the winter solstice, and G its

setting at the winter solstice. Draw a diameter from Z to G from D

to E. Then since those things are locally contrary which are most

distant from one another in space, and points diametrically opposite

are most distant from one another, those winds must necessarily be

contrary to one another that blow from opposite ends of a diameter.

The names of the winds according to their position are these.

Zephyrus is the wind that blows from A, this being the point where the

sun sets at the equinox. Its contrary is Apeliotes blowing from B

the point where the sun rises at the equinox. The wind blowing from H,

the north, is the true north wind, called Aparctias: while Notus

blowing from O is its contrary; for this point is the south and O is

contrary to H, being diametrically opposite to it. Caecias blows

from Z, where the sun rises at the summer solstice. Its contrary is

not the wind blowing from E but Lips blowing from G. For Lips blows

from the point where the sun sets at the winter solstice and is

diametrically opposite to Caecias: so it is its contrary. Eurus

blows from D, coming from the point where the sun rises at the

winter solstice. It borders on Notus, and so we often find that people

speak of 'Euro-Noti'. Its contrary is not Lips blowing from G but

the wind that blows from E which some call Argestes, some Olympias,

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